Connectivism: Political Communication of Indian National Political Parties via Facebook

Authors

  • Poonam Research Scholar, Department of Communication Management and Technology, Guru Jambeshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India
  • Vikram Kaushik Professor, Department of Communication Management and Technology, Guru Jambeshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India
  • Amit Sharma Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, Manipal University Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51983/arss-2022.11.2.3321

Keywords:

Connectivist Approach, Social Networking, Indian Politics, Political Campaign, Ideology

Abstract

Connectivism approach tells how social media connect people for information exchange. Political persons connect people on social media to make them aware about their plan and ideology. The objectives of the study are to know the association between the main political person in Facebook post, their ideology, objectives of the Facebook post of Indian national political parties and presence of bias in the post. We conducted quantitative research with the help of content analysis method. We used cross-sectional research design for collection of data. Total 538 post form official Facebook page of Indian national political parties have been collected through purposive sampling. Result indicates that political ideology is reflected on the national political party’s Facebook posts. While brick batting, image building and information sharing are the three main objectives of political posts of Facebook.

Author Biography

Amit Sharma, Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, Manipal University Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

 

 

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Published

28-10-2022

How to Cite

Poonam, Kaushik, V., & Sharma, A. (2022). Connectivism: Political Communication of Indian National Political Parties via Facebook. Asian Review of Social Sciences, 11(2), 54–59. https://doi.org/10.51983/arss-2022.11.2.3321

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